Department of Chemical Engineering

rrk

Dr. Ravikrishna R


Professor

MSB352

rrk@iitm.ac.in

+91 44 22574175


Research Areas


Contaminated sediment remediation, contaminant fate and transport, air pollution process and control


Research Interests:

The general research interests fall under the scope of Environmental Sciences and Engineering with specific focus on

fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. The following are the problems of current interest:

  • Passive Release of Bioaerosols from different sources
  • Behavior of Aerosols in Urban Environment
  • Fate and Transport of NAPLs in Earthen Media
  • Photocatalytic Treatment of Organic Wastes
  • Contaminated Sediments - Remediation / Fate and Transport

Academic Profile

2018-Present Professor, IIT-Madras, Chennai, India.
2013-2018 Associate Professor, IIT-Madras, Chennai, India.
2006-2013 Assistant Professor, IIT-Madras, Chennai, India.
2000-2006 Research Associate, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA.
1995-2000 Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering), Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA.
1993-1995 M.Tech. (Chemical Engineering), IIT-Madras, Chennai, India.
1989-1993 B.Tech.(Chemical Engineering), Osmania University, Hyderabad, India.


Research in our laboratory is in the general area of Environmental Science and Technology.


The predominant focus, however, is to study the fate and transport of pollutant constituents
in the natural and anthropogenic environment. The motivation for this is to be able to characterise
and predict the behavior of a pollutant when it enters the environment. This is done through a
combination of measurements and modeling, using laboratory experimental microcosms, field
measurements and computer simulation tools. This fate and transport information is useful in
framing policies for environmental and resource management. We are also interested in developing
methods for the treatment and remediation of waste in the environment. Domains of application include
water, air, soil, sediment and solid waste. There is also an overall interest in development of
inexpensive sensors and sensor methodologies for wide spread deployment in urban areas for the
monitoring of pollutants in the ambient environment.

Passive Release of Fungal Spores from Solid Waste Surfaces

The long-term objective is to be able to predict the passive release (flux or rate) of bioaerosols from different surfaces bearing solid food wastes found in domestic and municipal waste. Bioaerosol release rates can be used as input to dispersion models to predict ambient concentrations and consequent health effects and also in global climate models. Current work is in progress to characterise the release of fungal spores from simulated solid waste surfaces in laboratory microcosms. In controlled experiments, the sensitivity of passive release to different air velocity and relative humidity are measured. A preliminary energy-balance based mathematical model is being developed to provide a framework for predicting the fungal spore release. Future work is also planned on the visualisation of the aerodynamics of fungal spore release using microscopy and particle image velocimetry (PIV). This is being done in collaboration with Prof. Baburaj (Applied Mechanics). Other long term objectives are to develop and execute methodologies to measure bioaerosol release fluxes from real solid waste processing facilities and compare with model predictions. Some of this work is being done in collaboration with Prof. Sachin Gunthe (Civil Engg.)
Fate and Transport of Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) under environments of moisture cycling
(drying and rewetting) in Earthen Porous Media

Redistribution of NAPL due to Water Evaporation
Many contaminated earthen porous media (such as soils, dredged materials, sludges) may contain a significant amount of non aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), which are often mixtures of several organic compounds. Often these are present in addition to other organic pollutants as well. Since these porous media are exposed to air, they can potentially undergo drying (due to evaporation) and rewetting (due to rain). In preliminary experiments conducted in the laboratory, it was observed that the NAPL phase undergoes redistribution under conditions of water evaporation. This redistribution (or spreading) is significantly higher than that observed due to normal capillary rise. The fate and transport of the NAPL bulk phase under these conditions can be important in understanding the fate and transport of individual constituents present in the porous media. Characterisation of the fate and transport of the individual solutes require the realistic prediction of the NAPL bulk phase transport. The objective of this project are to characterise the NAPL bulk phase transport as a function of different rates of drying, NAPL and soil characteristics. We are trying to do this with a non-invasive technique – magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in collaboration with Prof. Chandrakumar (Chemistry) at the IIT-Madras MRI center. This project is currently funded by DST (Department of Science and Technology, Government of India) with Co-PIs – Prof. Chandrakumar (Chemistry) and Prof. Abhijit Deshpande (Chemical Engineering).
________________________________________


B.Tech & M.Tech( Naval Architecture & Ocean Engineering)

National Carbonaceous Aerosol Program (NCAP) – IITM is an Associate Institution in the Consortia of several Institutes in India led by IIT Bombay. (Co-Coordinators in IITM – Dr. S. M. Shiva Nagendra and Dr. Sachin Gunthe – Civil Engg., IIT-Madras)

The objectives of the program and our role are
• Developing a national carbonaceous aerosol emission inventory.
• Field emission factor measurement in four major sectors – Residential (cooking and lighting), Transport (diesel), Agriculture (field burning), Informal industry (brick production).
• PMF modelling for quantitative source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosols.
• Regional chemical transport modelling with the India carbonaceous aerosol emission inventory for quantitative estimation of carbonaceous aerosol source contribution.
• Obtain reconciliation of carbonaceous aerosol sources through top-down and bottom-up approaches at limited locations to evaluate and correct the emission inventory.
• Understanding climate and clean air impact of carbonaceous aerosols through regional climate modelling.
• Understanding influence of carbonaceous aerosols, on clouds and rainfall, through multi-scale models and general circulation modelling.
This project has been funded by the Ministry of Environments and Forest – Climate Change Division (Government of India).


Behavior or Aerosols in Urban Environment

The motivation in this problem is to be able to understand and predict the exposure of particulate matter for receptors in a dense traffic environment such as pedestrians at the kerbside and median in a road, commuters in two-wheelers, auto-rickshaws, open cars, buses and other vehicles. Measurement of these in such a dense traffic setting is logistically challenging. While continuing to measure exposure in different sections of the roads under different experimental objectives, as an alternative we have set out to conduct computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of a traffic environment to obtain 3-dimensional maps of gas phase and particulate phase components of exhaust in a representative traffic segment. In the initial effort, we have simulated a particular set of vehicles in a traffic segment under idling conditions studying the overall plume behavior along with exhaust-exhaust interactions (interactions of exhaust of one vehicle with those emitted from other vehicles in the segment) and exhaust-vehicle and exhaust road interactions ( deposition of particulates on vehicle and road surface). Further work will involve the simulation of moving vehicles, exchange with ambient air, different vehicular configurations and physical structures on the road. Measurements of concentration of particulate and gas phase components to validate the CFD simulations are also planned. The simulations are being done in collaboration with Prof. Srinivas Jayanti (Chemical Engineering)

Deposition and Resuspension of Particulate Matter on Different Surfaces

The general interest is to experimentally measure and model the rates of deposition and resuspension of interaction of ambient particulate matter on a variety of surfaces present in the ambient environment. These surfaces include those of paved roads, unpaved road shoulders, leaves on plants, indoor fans, cleaning tools, vehicle surfaces and on different filters used in urban traffic by humans. The goal is to obtain robust mathematical or empirical models to characterise the deposition and resuspension of particulate matter as input to general air quality models and develop applicational alternatives based on the data collected.


Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Chemicals using Titania-Carbon Mixtures

The objective is to study photocatalytic degradation of organic wastes using mixtures of carbon and titania. One of the applications for this is to explore the photocatalytic regeneration of spent activated carbon using titania embedded with the carbon. This problem has several engineering challenges including those of mass transfer, catalyst illumination and configuration of the carbon-titania mixture that need resolution. Laboratory experiments as well as modeling studies are being explored to study this. In collaboration with Prof. Raghuram Chetty (Chemical Engineering), we are also exploring the use of Ti and C nanotubes for the degradation of organic wastes.

Chemical Release from Exposed Contaminated Sediments and during Remediation

Contaminated sediments in rivers, lakes and coastal regions are a source of chemical release to the overlying water and possible to air. General research interest is in the various aspects associated with the prediction of the fate and transport of chemicals a) within contaminated sediments and across the sediment-water interface and b) during various remedial options such as dredging, capping and monitored natural recovery. There is specific interest in the measurement and modeling of chemical release during dredging and post-dredging operations. One of the research interests in this area is to develop a model to take into account the effect of particle-size dependent contaminant loading in the bed sediment and the consequences to contaminant fate and transport during dredging-induced resuspension.

Measurement and Modeling of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (PI: Dr. Sachin Gunthe - Civil Engg., IIT-Madras)

The objective is to measure and model cloud condensation nuclei in the Indian Subcontinent region using a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter. The measurements combined with the chemical characterisation of the aerosols will provide insights into the supersaturation of various types of aerosols abundant in the air mass in selected locations in the Indian Subcontinent. This information will have significant bearing on the effect of urban aerosols on the formation of cloud condensation nuclei and how they affect precipitation. This project has been funded by the Ministry of Earth Sciences (Government of India).
________________________________________

Measurement of Micropollutants in Various Water Sources in Chennai (PI: Dr. T. S. Chandra - Dept. of Biotechnology, IIT Madras)

The objective is to quantify several emerging micropollutants in urban water bodies – shallow wells, bore wells, metro water supply and lakes. Some of these pollutants are pharmaceuticals and personal care products. The analysis of the trace levels of these chemicals is done using SPE (solid phase extraction) and GC-MS (Gas Chromatography – Mass Spectrometer). The eventual objective is to link the concentrations to management of waste solids and wastewater in the urban Chennai region. There is increasing evidence of the impact of these pharmaceuticals on other biological species in water. The findings of this study has implications on the fate and transport of these emerging contaminants in the urban water cycle. This project is bing funded by the Department of Science and Technology (Government of India) through the Indo-German Center of Sustainability at IIT-Madras
Research in our laboratory is in the general area of Environmental Science and Technology.
The predominant focus, however, is to study the fate and transport of pollutant constituents
in the natural and anthropogenic environment. The motivation for this is to be able to characterise
and predict the behavior of a pollutant when it enters the environment. This is done through a
combination of measurements and modeling, using laboratory experimental microcosms, field
measurements and computer simulation tools. This fate and transport information is useful in
framing policies for environmental and resource management. We are also interested in developing
methods for the treatment and remediation of waste in the environment. Domains of application include
water, air, soil, sediment and solid waste. There is also an overall interest in development of
inexpensive sensors and sensor methodologies for wide spread deployment in urban areas for the
monitoring of pollutants in the ambient environment.


Passive Release of Fungal Spores from Solid Waste Surfaces

The long-term objective is to be able to predict the passive release (flux or rate) of bioaerosols from different surfaces bearing solid food wastes found in domestic and municipal waste. Bioaerosol release rates can be used as input to dispersion models to predict ambient concentrations and consequent health effects and also in global climate models. Current work is in progress to characterise the release of fungal spores from simulated solid waste surfaces in laboratory microcosms. In controlled experiments, the sensitivity of passive release to different air velocity and relative humidity are measured. A preliminary energy-balance based mathematical model is being developed to provide a framework for predicting the fungal spore release. Future work is also planned on the visualisation of the aerodynamics of fungal spore release using microscopy and particle image velocimetry (PIV). This is being done in collaboration with Prof. Baburaj (Applied Mechanics). Other long term objectives are to develop and execute methodologies to measure bioaerosol release fluxes from real solid waste processing facilities and compare with model predictions. Some of this work is being done in collaboration with Prof. Sachin Gunthe (Civil Engg.).

Redistribution of NAPL due to Water Evaporation

Fate and Transport of Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) under environments of moisture cycling
(drying and rewetting) in Earthen Porous Media
Many contaminated earthen porous media (such as soils, dredged materials, sludges) may contain a significant amount of non aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), which are often mixtures of several organic compounds. Often these are present in addition to other organic pollutants as well. Since these porous media are exposed to air, they can potentially undergo drying (due to evaporation) and rewetting (due to rain). In preliminary experiments conducted in the laboratory, it was observed that the NAPL phase undergoes redistribution under conditions of water evaporation. This redistribution (or spreading) is significantly higher than that observed due to normal capillary rise. The fate and transport of the NAPL bulk phase under these conditions can be important in understanding the fate and transport of individual constituents present in the porous media. Characterisation of the fate and transport of the individual solutes require the realistic prediction of the NAPL bulk phase transport. The objective of this project are to characterise the NAPL bulk phase transport as a function of different rates of drying, NAPL and soil characteristics. We are trying to do this with a non-invasive technique – magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in collaboration with Prof. Chandrakumar (Chemistry) at the IIT-Madras MRI center. This project is currently funded by DST (Department of Science and Technology, Government of India) with Co-PIs – Prof. Chandrakumar (Chemistry) and Prof. Abhijit Deshpande (Chemical Engineering).


National Carbonaceous Aerosol Program (NCAP) - IITM is an Associate Institution in the Consortia of several Institutes in India led by IIT Bombay. (Co-Coordinators in IITM - Dr. S. M. Shiva Nagendra and Dr. Sachin Gunthe - Civil Engg., IIT-Madras)

The objectives of the program and our role are
• Developing a national carbonaceous aerosol emission inventory.
• Field emission factor measurement in four major sectors – Residential (cooking and lighting), Transport (diesel), Agriculture (field burning), Informal industry (brick production).
• PMF modelling for quantitative source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosols.
• Regional chemical transport modelling with the India carbonaceous aerosol emission inventory for quantitative estimation of carbonaceous aerosol source contribution.
• Obtain reconciliation of carbonaceous aerosol sources through top-down and bottom-up approaches at limited locations to evaluate and correct the emission inventory.
• Understanding climate and clean air impact of carbonaceous aerosols through regional climate modelling.
• Understanding influence of carbonaceous aerosols, on clouds and rainfall, through multi-scale models and general circulation modelling.

This project has been funded by the Ministry of Environments and Forest - Climate Change Division (Government of India).

The motivation in this problem is to be able to understand and predict the exposure of particulate matter for receptors in a dense traffic environment such as pedestrians at the kerbside and median in a road, commuters in two-wheelers, auto-rickshaws, open cars, buses and other vehicles. Measurement of these in such a dense traffic setting is logistically challenging. While continuing to measure exposure in different sections of the roads under different experimental objectives, as an alternative we have set out to conduct computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of a traffic environment to obtain 3-dimensional maps of gas phase and particulate phase components of exhaust in a representative traffic segment. In the initial effort, we have simulated a particular set of vehicles in a traffic segment under idling conditions studying the overall plume behavior along with exhaust-exhaust interactions (interactions of exhaust of one vehicle with those emitted from other vehicles in the segment) and exhaust-vehicle and exhaust road interactions ( deposition of particulates on vehicle and road surface). Further work will involve the simulation of moving vehicles, exchange with ambient air, different vehicular configurations and physical structures on the road. Measurements of concentration of particulate and gas phase components to validate the CFD simulations are also planned. The simulations are being done in collaboration with Prof. Srinivas Jayanti (Chemical Engineering)

Deposition and Resuspension of Particulate Matter on Different Surfaces

The general interest is to experimentally measure and model the rates of deposition and resuspension of interaction of ambient particulate matter on a variety of surfaces present in the ambient environment. These surfaces include those of paved roads, unpaved road shoulders, leaves on plants, indoor fans, cleaning tools, vehicle surfaces and on different filters used in urban traffic by humans. The goal is to obtain robust mathematical or empirical models to characterise the deposition and resuspension of particulate matter as input to general air quality models and develop applicational alternatives based on the data collected.


Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Chemicals using Titania-Carbon Mixtures

The objective is to study photocatalytic degradation of organic wastes using mixtures of carbon and titania. One of the applications for this is to explore the photocatalytic regeneration of spent activated carbon using titania embedded with the carbon. This problem has several engineering challenges including those of mass transfer, catalyst illumination and configuration of the carbon-titania mixture that need resolution. Laboratory experiments as well as modeling studies are being explored to study this. In collaboration with Prof. Raghuram Chetty (Chemical Engineering), we are also exploring the use of Ti and C nanotubes for the degradation of organic wastes.

Chemical Release from Exposed Contaminated Sediments and during Remediation

Contaminated sediments in rivers, lakes and coastal regions are a source of chemical release to the overlying water and possible to air. General research interest is in the various aspects associated with the prediction of the fate and transport of chemicals a) within contaminated sediments and across the sediment-water interface and b) during various remedial options such as dredging, capping and monitored natural recovery. There is specific interest in the measurement and modeling of chemical release during dredging and post-dredging operations. One of the research interests in this area is to develop a model to take into account the effect of particle-size dependent contaminant loading in the bed sediment and the consequences to contaminant fate and transport during dredging-induced resuspension.


Measurement and Modeling of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (PI: Dr. Sachin Gunthe - Civil Engg., IIT-Madras)

The objective is to measure and model cloud condensation nuclei in the Indian Subcontinent region using a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter. The measurements combined with the chemical characterisation of the aerosols will provide insights into the supersaturation of various types of aerosols abundant in the air mass in selected locations in the Indian Subcontinent. This information will have significant bearing on the effect of urban aerosols on the formation of cloud condensation nuclei and how they affect precipitation. This project has been funded by the Ministry of Earth Sciences (Government of India).

Measurement of Micropollutants in Various Water Sources in Chennai (PI: Dr. T. S. Chandra - Dept. of Biotechnology, IIT Madras)

The objective is to quantify several emerging micropollutants in urban water bodies – shallow wells, bore wells, metro water supply and lakes. Some of these pollutants are pharmaceuticals and personal care products. The analysis of the trace levels of these chemicals is done using SPE (solid phase extraction) and GC-MS (Gas Chromatography – Mass Spectrometer). The eventual objective is to link the concentrations to management of waste solids and wastewater in the urban Chennai region. There is increasing evidence of the impact of these pharmaceuticals on other biological species in water. The findings of this study has implications on the fate and transport of these emerging contaminants in the urban water cycle. This project is bing funded by the Department of Science and Technology (Government of India) through the Indo-German Center of Sustainability at IIT-Madras

List of All Courses Taught

  • CH 3030 - Mass Transfer Applications (2010-2013, 2017, 2018, 2019) - CORE.
  • CH 3520/3521 - Heat and Mass Transfer Laboratory (2008-2019) - CORE.
  • CH 5370 - Environmental Quality - Monitoring and Assessment (2008-present) ELECTIVE.
  • CH 5460 - Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering (2008-present) - ELECTIVE.
  • ID 1200 - Ecology and Environment (2013, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019) (Co-Coordination and Partial Instruction)
  • CH 1020 - Process Calculations (2015) - CORE.
  • CH 5020 - Experimental and Analytical Methods in Chemical Engineering (2006-2009)- CORE (With Prof. Arun Tangirala).
  • CH 6200 - Environmental Chemodynamics (2007,2008) - ELECTIVE.
  • CH 5280 - Air Pollution and Control (2008) - ELECTIVE.

Current Students

Ph.D.

  • Ravinder, A. (Passive Release of Fungal Spores from Solid Waste)
  • Subha S. Raj (Characterisation of Cloud Condensation Nuclei) - Co-guided with Prof. Sachin Gunthe (Civil Engineering)
  • Christi Jose (Hygroscopicity measurement of ambient aerosols) - Co-guided with Prof. Sachin Gunthe (Civil Engineering)

M.Tech. / Dual Degree

  • Anarghya, G. (Photocatalysis of organic compounds using Titania-Carbon Mixtures)

B.Tech.

Project Staff

  • Dr. Jaivignesh, V (Monitoring of AMR genes and cofactors in waterbodies in Chennai region)
  • Jithin, K. P. (COALESCE, National Carbonaceous Aerosol Program)
  • Laxmi Prasad (COALESCE, National Carbonaceous Aerosol Program)
  • Adi Yogesh. (COALESCE, National Carbonaceous Aerosol Program)
  • Sujit Singh (COALESCE, National Carbonaceous Aerosol Program)

Collaborators

  • Dr. T. Swaminathan (Dept. of Chemical Engineering (retd.), IIT-Madras)
  • Dr. Srinivas Jayanti (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, IIT-Madras)
  • Dr. Raghuram Chetty (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, IIT-Madras)
  • Dr. Abhijit Deshpande (Dept. Of Chemical Engineering, IIT-Madras)
  • Dr. T. Renganathan (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, IIT-Madras)
  • Dr. Indumathi Nambi (Dept. of Civil Engineering, IIT-Madras)
  • Dr. Sachin Gunthe (Dept. of Civil Engineering, IIT-Madras)
  • Dr. S. M. Shiva Nagendra (Dept. of Civil Engineering, IIT-Madras)
  • Dr. A. P. Baburaj (Dept. of Applied Mechanics, IIT-Madras)
  • Dr. T. S. Chandra (Dept. of Biotechnology, IIT-Madras)
  • Dr. N. Chandrakumar (Dept. of Chemistry, IIT-Madras)

Group Alumni

M.S / Ph.D.

  • Dhivakar, G. (Ph.D. - 2019) (NAPL transport in Porous Media)
  • Saranya, G. (Ph.D. - 2017) (Passive Release of Fungal Spores from Simulated Solid Waste)
  • Savitha, R. (Ph.D. - 2017) (Synthesis of Titania Nanotubes - application in Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Compounds) - Co-guided with Prof. Raghuram Chetty
  • G. Swamy Undi (M.S. - 2015) - (Co-Guided by Prof. Srinivas Jayanti) - Currently pursuing Ph.D. in Dept of Civil Engg.
  • Sivagami, K. (Ph.D. - 2013) - Currently DST Fellow at Civil Engineering, IIT-Madras
  • Abhilasha, K. (M.S. - 2013) - Currently pursuing Ph.D. at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, USA.

M.Tech. / Dual Degree

  • Syama, S (M.Tech.) - 2019
  • Jencen Mathai (M.Tech.) - 2018
  • Siddasai, K (M.Tech.) - 2017
  • Sarvesh, C (D. D) - 2017
  • Vijay Prasad (D. D) - 2015 (Jointly with Prof. Jayanti)
  • Anamika Rathor (D. D) - 2015
  • Pranay Wasekar (M.Tech.) - 2015
  • Merit Mathew (M.Tech.) - 2014
  • Subramanian, R. (D. D.) - 2014 (Jointly with Prof. Jayanti)
  • Saptaparna Sarkar (M.Tech.) - 2013
  • Tushar Dutta (M.Tech.) - 2013
  • Srinivas, J. (M.Tech.) - 2012
  • Venkatesh, M. (M.Tech.) - 2012
  • Arun K. Devassikutty (M.Tech.) - 2011
  • Adinarayanana, K. N. V. (M.Tech.) - 2011
  • Rama Rao, K (M.Tech.) - 2011
  • Mahesh Kanithi (M.Tech.) - 2010
  • Surendra Babu (M.Tech.) - 2009
  • Prathamesh Ekawde (M.Tech.) - 2009
  • Ravikumar, K (M.Tech.) - 2008

B. Tech.

  • Manish Kumar (2019)
  • Chandray K (2019)
  • Paras Kumar (2019)
  • Sri Charan P (2019)
  • Chaitanya (2018)
  • Nishanth (2018)
  • Yashasvini (2017)
  • Jaydeep T (2017)
  • Mohd. Afnaz (2016)
  • A. Sushanth (2016)
  • T. Tharun (2015)
  • B. Prasad (2015)
  • Balaraju (2015)
  • Sivaprasad (2015)
  • T. Akshay (2014)
  • K. Hemalatha (2014)
  • P. Lalitha (2014)
  • N. Srinivas (2014)
  • N. Abhinav (2013)
  • M. Gopikrishna (2013)
  • Ramya R (2013)
  • Roshan Wathore (2012)
  • S. Prithviraj (2012)
  • Ganesh Shankar (2011)
  • Nakeeb Nazeemuddin (2011)
  • P. Vijay (2011)
  • Arpit Mundra (2010)
  • Ajay Singh Jadaun (2010)
  • Himanshu Jasuja (2010)
  • Anirudh Govindrajan(2009)
  • M. Pramodh (2009)
  • Naresh Pavurala (2008)
  • Anil Chaitanya (2008)

External Students (B.Tech. Project)

  • Pramod Sripada (SASTRA University) - Currently pursuing Ph.D. at Monash University (Australia)

Visiting Faculty

  • Dr. Suresh Dhaniyala (Apr - Oct, 2009) - Clarkson University, USA
  • Dr. Rainer Lohmann (Jan - Feb, 2011) - University of Rhode Island, USA

Publications

54 entries « 1 of 8 »

2022

Gopinath, A K; Raj, S S; Kommula, S M; Jose, C; Panda, U; Bishambu, Y; Ojha, N; Ravikrishna, R; Liu, P; Gunthe, S S: Complex Interplay Between Organic and Secondary Inorganic Aerosols With Ambient Relative Humidity Implicates the Aerosol Liquid Water Content Over India During Wintertime. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 127 (13), 2022, ISSN: 2169897X. (Type: Journal Article | Links | BibTeX)
Gopalakrishnan, S; Arigela, R; Thyagarajan, S; Raghunathan, R: Comparison and evaluation of enumeration methods for measurement of fungal spore emission. Journal of Aerosol Science, 165 , 2022, ISSN: 00218502. (Type: Journal Article | Links | BibTeX)

2021

Raj, S S.; Krüger, O O; Sharma, A; Panda, U; Pöhlker, C; Walter, D; Förster, J -D; Singh, R P; Swetha, S; Klimach, T; Darbyshire, E; Martin, S T; McFiggans, G; Coe, H; Allan, J; Ravikrishna, R; Soni, V K; Su, H; Andreae, M O; Pöschl, U; Pöhlker, M L; Gunthe, S S: Planetary Boundary Layer Height Modulates Aerosol—Water Vapor Interactions During Winter in the Megacity of Delhi. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 126 (24), 2021, ISSN: 2169897X. (Type: Journal Article | Links | BibTeX)
Kommula, S M; Upasana, P; Sharma, A; Raj, S S; Reyes-Villegas, E; Liu, T; Allan, J D; Jose, C; Pöhlker, M L; Ravikrishna, R; Liu, P; Su, H; Martin, S T; Pöschl, U; McFiggans, G; Coe, H; Gunthe, S S: Chemical Characterization and Source Apportionment of Organic Aerosols in the Coastal City of Chennai, India: Impact of Marine Air Masses on Aerosol Chemical Composition and Potential for Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation. ACS Earth and Space Chemistry, 5 (11), pp. 3197-3209, 2021, ISSN: 24723452. (Type: Journal Article | Links | BibTeX)
Gunthe, S S; Liu, P; Panda, U; Raj, S S; Sharma, A; Darbyshire, E; Reyes-Villegas, E; Allan, J; Chen, Y; Wang, X; Song, S; Pöhlker, M L; Shi, L; Wang, Y; Kommula, S M; Liu, T; Ravikrishna, R; McFiggans, G; Mickley, L J; Martin, S T; Pöschl, U; Andreae, M O; Coe, H: Enhanced aerosol particle growth sustained by high continental chlorine emission in India. Nature Geoscience, 14 (2), pp. 77-84, 2021, ISSN: 17520894. (Type: Journal Article | Links | BibTeX)

2020

Shika, S; Gadhavi, H; Suman, M N S; Ravikrishna, R; Gunthe, S S: Atmospheric aerosol properties at a semi-rural location in southern India: particle size distributions and implications for cloud droplet formation. SN Applied Sciences, 2 (6), 2020, ISSN: 25233971. (Type: Journal Article | Links | BibTeX)
Govindarajan, D; Banerjee, A; Chandrakumar, N; Raghunathan, R: Magnetic resonance imaging of enhanced mobility of light non aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) during drying of water wet porous media. Journal of Contaminant Hydrology, 234 , 2020, ISSN: 01697722. (Type: Journal Article | Links | BibTeX)
54 entries « 1 of 8 »